Income Tax Challan for IDS: Income Declaration Scheme Challan No ITNS 286

Download the Income Tax Challan for IDS, Tax Payer i.e. Declarant can deposit Income Tax liability under Income Tax Declaration Scheme using Income Tax Form ITNS 286

Total Tax Liability under IDS is 45% of Income Declare under IDS (30% Tax + 15% Penalty) Those who have declare Income under IDS have to deposit tax and penalty in following ratio or Schedule for Payment of Tax & Penalty under IDS

  1. 25% of Tax, Surcharge & Penalty by 30th November 2016
  2. 25% of Tax, Surcharge & Penalty by 31st March 2017
  3. Remaining 50% of Tax, Surcharge & Penalty by 30th September 2017

For IDS separate challan has to be used in ITNS FORM 286 Download the Income Tax

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Form 286

 

Income Tax Department List of defaulters of Income Tax/Corporate Tax

Income Tax Department has issued the list of defaulters of Income Tax/Corporate Tax

Income Tax Defaulters list includes total of 31+18 = 49 Names which includes Individuals, HUF and Corporate Entities. List Includes 16 Individual and 33 Companies

LIST OF INCOME TAX DEFAULTERS(as published by Income Tax Department for details download full list given at the end)

S.NoCorporateIndividual
1KRR INFRA PROJECTS PVT. LTD. INDRAVARDAN V DARBAR
2DHARNENDRA INDUSTRIES LTD.DEVENDRA KANTILAL SHAH
3GUJARAT PIPES LTD.RAJNIKANT M DESAI
4UNITED CREDIT & INVESTMENTSGIRISH PRABHU DAS RUPAREL
5TOTEM INFRASTRUCTURE LTD.CYRIL RONALD RODRIGUES
6ROYAL FABRICS PVT. LTDKRUSHI VENKATESWARA RAO
7GENEX TECHNOLOGIES PVT. LTD.ZAKKI ABDUL HASSAN KHAN
8NANO EXCEL ENTERPRISES PVT. LTD.KHAN GARMENTS
9TAKSHEEL SOLUTIONS LTDBIJAPURAM MUKUND RAO
10GVS INFRA AND INDUSTRIES PVT  LTD.TUSHAR MUGATLAL SHAH
11RANKLIN SOLUTIONS LTD.BHARAT S. KHONA
12MDL TECHNOLOGIES PVT. LTDGOPAL KRISHNAJI DHARNE [Late] Legal Heir : Atul  Gopal Dharne (Son)
13INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AND SERVICES NEEDS INDIA PVT. LTD.REETINDER SIDHU
14ORO TRADE NETWORK INDIA LTD.LAXMINARAYAN T. THAKKAR (HUF)
15HOME TRADE LTDATUL JASHVANTRAI MEHTA
16PAMIS TEX PVT. LTD.Late Shri. G. K. DHARNE
Legal Heir : Atul Gopal Dharne (Son)
17PATHEJA BROS. FORGINGS & AUTO PARTS MFG. CO. LTD.
18PATHEJA BROS FORGINGS & STAMPINGS LTD.
19BLUE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LTD.
20JUPITOR BUSINESS LIMITED
21HIRAK BIOTECH LTD
22ICON BIO PHARMA & HEALTH CARE LIMITED
[Formerly known as moon drugs limited]
23APPLITECH SOLUTIONS LIMITED
24BANYAN & BERRY ALLOYS LTD.
25SOMANI CEMENT CO. LTD. KHARSALIYA
26DIGITAL PC TECHNOLOGIES PVT.LTD
27GOLDSUKH TRADE INDIA LTD.
28VICTOR CREDIT & CONSTRUCTION PVT. LTD.
29NOBLE MERCHANDISE LTD.
30PROTECH INTRADE PVT. LTD.
31POONAM INDUSTRIES LTD.
32KUNVAR AJAY FOOD PVT. LTD
33VIRAJ DYEING & PRINTING PVT. LTD.

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History of Income Tax Post Independence

  1. Preliminary :

    The rapid changes in administration of direct taxes, during the last decades, reflect the history of socio-economic thinking in India. From 1922 to the present day changes in direct tax laws have been so rapid that except in the bare outlines, the traces of the I.T. Act, 1922 can hardly be seen in the 1961 Act as it stands amended to date. It was but natural, in these circumstances that the set up of the department should not only expand but undergo structural changes as well.

  2. Changes in administrative set up since the inception of the department:

    The organisational history of the Income-tax Department starts in the year 1922. The Income-tax Act, 1922, gave, for the first time, a specific nomenclature to various Income-tax authorities. The foundation of a proper system of administration was thus laid. In 1924, Central Board of Revenue Act constituted the Board as a statutory body with functional responsibilities for the administration of the Income-tax Act. Commissioners of Income- tax were appointed separately for each province and Assistant Commissioners and Income-tax Officers were provided under their control. The amendments to the Income tax Act, in 1939, made two vital structural changes: (i) appellate functions were separated from administrative functions; a class of officers, known as Appellate Assistant Commissioners, thus came into existence, and (ii) a central charge was created in Bombay. In 1940, with a view to exercising effective control over the progress and inspection of the work of Income-tax Department throughout India, the very first attached office of the Board, called Directorate of Inspection (Income Tax) – was created. As a result of separation of executive and judicial functions, in 1941, the Appellate Tribunal came into existence. In the same year, a central charge was created in Calcutta also.

    1. World War II brought unusual profits to businessmen. During 1940 to 1947, Excess Profits Tax and Business Profits Tax were introduced and their administration handed over to the Department (These were later repealed in 1946 and 1949 respectively). In 1951, the 1st Voluntary Disclosure Scheme was brought in. It was during this period, in 1946, that a few Group ‘A’ officers were directly recruited. Later on in 1953, the Group ‘A’ Service was formally constituted as the ‘Indian Revenue Service’.
    2. This era was characterised by considerable emphasis on development of investigation techniques. In 1947, Taxation on Income (Investigation) Commission was set up which was declared ultra vires by the Supreme Court in 1956 but the necessity of deep investigation had by then been realised. In 1952, the Directorate of Inspection (Investigation) was set up. It was in this year that a new cadre known as Inspectors of Income Tax was created. The increase in ‘large income’ cases necessitated checking of the work done by departmental officers. Thus in 1954, the Internal Audit Scheme was introduced in the Income-tax Department.
    3. As indicated earlier, in 1946, for the first time a few Group A officers were recruited in the department. Training them was important. The new recruits were sent to Bombay and Calcutta where they were trained, though not in an organised manner. In 1957, I.R.S. (Direct Taxes) Staff College started functioning in Nagpur. Today this attached office of the Board functions under a Director-General. It is called the National Academy of Direct Taxes. By 1963, the I.T. department, burdened with the administration of several other Acts like W.T., G.T., E.D., etc., had expanded to such an extent that it was considered necessary to put it under a separate Board. Consequently, the Central Board of Revenue Act, 1963 was passed. The Central Board of Direct Taxes was constituted, under this Act.
    4. The developing nature of the economy of the country brought with it both steep rates of taxes and black incomes. In 1965, the Voluntary Disclosure Scheme was brought in followed by the 1975 Disclosure Scheme. Finally, the need for a permanent settlement mechanism resulted in the creation of the Settlement Commission.
    5. A very important administrative change occurred during this period. The recovery of arrears of tax which till 1970 was the function of State authorities was passed on to the departmental officers. A whole new wing of Officers – Tax Recovery Officers was created and a new cadre of post of Tax Recovery Commissioners was introduced w.e.f. 1-1-1972.

      In 1993 a Working Group was set up by the Government to recommend computerization of the department. Based on the report of the Working Group a comprehensive computerization plan was approved by the Government in October, 1993. In pursuance of this, Regional Computer Centres were set up in Delhi, Mumbai, and Chennai in 1994-95 with RS6000/59H Servers. PCs were first provided to officers in these cities in phases.

  3. Important events in the Income-tax department:

     

Year

Event

1992

Rs. 1400 Presumptive Taxation scheme introduced as a measure to widen tax base.

1994

New PAN introduced.

1997

Presumptive tax scheme discontinued.

Voluntary Disclosure Scheme 1997 introduced

Minimum Alternate Tax introduced

1998

Sec. 260A introduced enabling direct appeals to High Court.

1/6 Scheme & penalty for non-filing of return introduced to widen tax base.

Gift-tax abolished for gifts made after 1.10.1998

2002

Computerized processing of returns all over the country introduced

 

History of Tax

The word “Tax” is originated from the latin word taxare which means to feel, estimate, censure and as per the Webster dictionary first known use of the Word “Tax” relates back to 14th Century. As we go by the literal meaning of the word “tax” it means to assess or determine judicially the amount of (costs in a court action). Tax can be levied either on the sale and purchase of merchandise or livestock and from the past history we can also conclude that it was collected in a haphazard manner. Nearly 2000 years ago, there went out a decree from Ceaser Augustus that the entire world should be taxed. In Greece, Germany and Roman Empires, taxes were also levied sometime on the basis of turnover and sometimes on occupations. For many centuries, revenue from taxes went to the Monarch. In Northern England, taxes were levied on land and on moveable property such as the Saladin title in 1188. Later on, these were supplemented by introduction of poll taxes, and indirect taxes known as “Ancient Customs” which were duties on wool, leather and hides. These levies and taxes in various forms and on various commodities and professions were imposed to meet the needs of the Governments to meet their military and civil expenditure and not only to ensure safety to the subjects but also to meet the common needs of the citizens like maintenance of roads, administration of justice and such other functions of the State.

 
 

In India, the system of direct taxation as it is known today has been in force in one form or another even from ancient times. There are references both in Manu Smriti and Arthasastra to a variety of tax measures. Manu, the ancient sage and law-giver stated that the king could levy taxes, according to Sastras. The wise sage advised that taxes should be related to the income and expenditure of the subject. He, however, cautioned the king against excessive taxation and stated that both extremes should be avoided namely either complete absence of taxes or exorbitant taxation. According to him, the king should arrange the collection of taxes in such a manner that the subjects did not feel the pinch of paying taxes. He laid down that traders and artisans should pay 1/5th of their profits in silver and gold, while the agriculturists were to pay 1/6th, 1/8th and 1/10th of their produce depending upon their circumstances. The detailed analysis given by Manu on the subject clearly shows the existence of a well-planned taxation system, even in ancient times. Not only this, taxes were also levied on various classes of people like actors, dancers, singers and even dancing girls. Taxes were paid in the shape of gold-coins, cattle, grains, raw-materials and also by rendering personal service.

However, it is Kautilya’s Arthasastra, which deals with the system of taxation in a real elaborate and planned manner. This well known treatise on state crafts written sometime in 300 B.C., when the Mauryan Empire was as its glorious upwards move, is truly amazing, for its deep study of the civilisation of that time and the suggestions given which should guide a king in running the State in a most efficient and fruitful manner. A major portion of Arthasastra is devoted by Kautilya to financial matters including financial administration. According to famous statesman, the Mauryan system, so far as it applied to agriculture, was a sort of state landlordism and the collection of land revenue formed an important source of revenue to the State. The State not only collected a part of the agricultural produce which was normally one sixth but also levied water rates, octroi duties, tolls and customs duties. Taxes were also collected on forest produce as well as from mining of metals etc. Salt tax was an important source of revenue and it was collected at the place of its extraction.

 
 

Kautilya described in detail, the trade and commerce carried on with foreign countries and the active interest of the Mauryan Empire to promote such trade. Goods were imported from China, Ceylon and other countries and levy known as a vartanam was collected on all foreign commodities imported in the country. There was another levy called Dvarodaya which was paid by the concerned businessman for the import of foreign goods. In addition, ferry fees of all kinds were levied to augment the tax collection.